Man Vs. toilet

"Everyone needs to go..."
Travel Blog.

Ask me anything

Archive

RSS

Social

Facebook

Twitter

Vimeo

YouTube

Theme
  1. Night Levi’s with dirt all over them cause that’s a wrap. Night @jaredman25 cause you’re a good man. Au reviour. Night Levi’s with dirt all over them cause that’s a wrap. Night @jaredman25 cause you’re a good man. Au reviour.
    High Resolution

    Night Levi’s with dirt all over them cause that’s a wrap. Night @jaredman25 cause you’re a good man. Au reviour.

  2. Desert toilet. Desert toilet.
    High Resolution

    Desert toilet.

  3. Die Katze. Die Katze.
    High Resolution

    Die Katze.

  4. #racksonracka #yakima #ford #fordfiesta #raptor #cycling and #surfing machine. #racksonracka #yakima #ford #fordfiesta #raptor #cycling and #surfing machine.
    High Resolution

    #racksonracka #yakima #ford #fordfiesta #raptor #cycling and #surfing machine.

  5. Ok, so when I was in Sri Lanka I worked out all day surfing and doing construction in the southeast. The weather is hot and humid. Nearly 120 degrees in the shade! The ocean was only 87 degrees by noon… And you would walk to every destination. Flip flops, board shorts, and tank tops were the staple clothes. Anything else and it was too hot. At night the coldest it got was at about 4 am. And you knew this, because the mosques would begin their call to prayer which would wake you, and though annoying at first, it became a soothing time to enjoy the cool air culture.

                The food was amazing, a mix between Thai and Indian food; spicy and sweet. Coconut, roti, lime, onions, and chili powder, and rice mixed with vegetables made up for pretty much every single meal all day every day. Three weeks in it hit me. I want meat. I’ve seen friends and locals eating meat. Given they have been there for years or all their lives; they probably are immune to bacteria. So I went to local family restaurant and ordered a plate of Cotu Roti. Cotu Roti is vegetables and chopped meat thrown onto a hot plate. The meat is water buffalo.  But the meat would sit out on the shelves all day or maybe a couple days. I dug in!

                The next day I am pretty sure I sprinted for the bathroom. I also am pretty sure it was me that backed up the plumbing… Sorry Andy. I think I took responsibility for that instance, but just in case I did not.

                The following day we went down the coast to a surf spot. I was filming, then it just hit! I pooped in the ocean. I pooped on a rock that may or may have not been sacred. I hope it wasn’t. I pooped while in the lineup surfing. A friend paddled up, looked at me and asked, “Are you?” I nodded, he paddled away.

                Later that evening I went to a local pastor’s house/church. In the middle of the tour, I ran for their outhouse. It was very dark with two bricks next to a hole. I squatted then exploded all over, I don’t even think I hit the hole! Poop was all over the walls; I cupped water in my hands and tried to rinse everything down while balancing on the bricks. There was no toilet paper either. So I found a hose spout outside the outhouse. I squatted down and dropped the back end while splashing it clean. The pastor’s mother was hanging laundry out to dry. She saw me, and just shook her head exactly like my grandma would do. I pulled up my shorts and took off.

                I never did return to their house after that instance. And I definitely did not the delicious Cotu Roti again. On the plus side I lost like 25 pounds.

               

  6. Get Ready

    The southeast is an amazing location to run around, smell, see, hear, and soak in every ounce of civilization or the lack of.

    Also the food is amazing, and on the other hand can destroy one’s bowels.

    Story coming soon. Travel to Sri Lanka, learn about the food, culture, and perhaps a humorous warning to your stomach.

  7. vicemag:

This 16-Year-Old Made an App That Exposes Sellout Politicians
With US politics swimming in so much corporate money that it’s pretty much an oligarchy, it can be hard to keep track of which particular set of lobbyists is trying to milk more cash out of healthcare, fossil fuels and other very important issues from one week to the next.
But thanks to 16-year-old Nick Rubin, keeping track of just how much politicians have sold out has become a lot easier. He created Greenhouse, a new browser plugin which operates under the motto, “Some are red. Some are blue. All are green.” The plugin aims “to shine light on a social and industrial disease of today: the undue influence of money in our Congress.” It sounds like a bit of a lofty aim for an app, but it’s actually pretty simple and effective—it provides a break down of a politician’s campaign contributions when that politician’s name comes up in an article. It is currently available for Chrome, Firefox and Safari and is completely free. As you can imagine, reading about how your Member of Congress voted in a recent health bill becomes all the more enlightening if you know how much money the health industry showered him in at the last election.
I spoke to Nick Rubin about the plugin, politics and what he calls the “money stories” behind what you read in the news.

VICE: Hi Nick. So how did you come up with the idea for Greenhouse?Nick Rubin: Back in seventh grade, I gave a presentation on corporate personhood and ever since then I’ve been really interested in that issue. I think the one problem is that the sources of income for members of congress haven’t been simple and easily accessible when people have needed it. More recently, I’ve been teaching myself how to code and I thought that something like Greenhouse that puts the data at people’s fingertips would be a perfect solution. It really is the intersection of these two passions of mine—coding and politics. I made it after school and on weekends on my computer.
Why the name?Well, green is the color of money in the US, and house refers to the two houses of Congress [the Senate and House of Representatives]. The name also implies transparency; greenhouses are see through and they are built to help things thrive.
Where did you get the information on the politician’s donations?It uses the data from the last full election cycle which was 2012. This is simply because it’s just the most complete set of data that we have. But, the browser does provide access to the most up to date 2014 information by just clicking the name of the politician on the top of the window or theOpenSecrets.org link in the popup. So the 2014 data is just one click away.
I’m intending to update the data as a whole later in the election cycle as the 2014 contributions are more complete. These are updates I’m currently working on, as well as thinking of other ways I can expand the tool.
Continue
vicemag:

This 16-Year-Old Made an App That Exposes Sellout Politicians
With US politics swimming in so much corporate money that it’s pretty much an oligarchy, it can be hard to keep track of which particular set of lobbyists is trying to milk more cash out of healthcare, fossil fuels and other very important issues from one week to the next.
But thanks to 16-year-old Nick Rubin, keeping track of just how much politicians have sold out has become a lot easier. He created Greenhouse, a new browser plugin which operates under the motto, “Some are red. Some are blue. All are green.” The plugin aims “to shine light on a social and industrial disease of today: the undue influence of money in our Congress.” It sounds like a bit of a lofty aim for an app, but it’s actually pretty simple and effective—it provides a break down of a politician’s campaign contributions when that politician’s name comes up in an article. It is currently available for Chrome, Firefox and Safari and is completely free. As you can imagine, reading about how your Member of Congress voted in a recent health bill becomes all the more enlightening if you know how much money the health industry showered him in at the last election.
I spoke to Nick Rubin about the plugin, politics and what he calls the “money stories” behind what you read in the news.

VICE: Hi Nick. So how did you come up with the idea for Greenhouse?Nick Rubin: Back in seventh grade, I gave a presentation on corporate personhood and ever since then I’ve been really interested in that issue. I think the one problem is that the sources of income for members of congress haven’t been simple and easily accessible when people have needed it. More recently, I’ve been teaching myself how to code and I thought that something like Greenhouse that puts the data at people’s fingertips would be a perfect solution. It really is the intersection of these two passions of mine—coding and politics. I made it after school and on weekends on my computer.
Why the name?Well, green is the color of money in the US, and house refers to the two houses of Congress [the Senate and House of Representatives]. The name also implies transparency; greenhouses are see through and they are built to help things thrive.
Where did you get the information on the politician’s donations?It uses the data from the last full election cycle which was 2012. This is simply because it’s just the most complete set of data that we have. But, the browser does provide access to the most up to date 2014 information by just clicking the name of the politician on the top of the window or theOpenSecrets.org link in the popup. So the 2014 data is just one click away.
I’m intending to update the data as a whole later in the election cycle as the 2014 contributions are more complete. These are updates I’m currently working on, as well as thinking of other ways I can expand the tool.
Continue
    High Resolution

    vicemag:

    This 16-Year-Old Made an App That Exposes Sellout Politicians

    With US politics swimming in so much corporate money that it’s pretty much an oligarchy, it can be hard to keep track of which particular set of lobbyists is trying to milk more cash out of healthcare, fossil fuels and other very important issues from one week to the next.

    But thanks to 16-year-old Nick Rubin, keeping track of just how much politicians have sold out has become a lot easier. He created Greenhouse, a new browser plugin which operates under the motto, “Some are red. Some are blue. All are green.” The plugin aims “to shine light on a social and industrial disease of today: the undue influence of money in our Congress.” It sounds like a bit of a lofty aim for an app, but it’s actually pretty simple and effective—it provides a break down of a politician’s campaign contributions when that politician’s name comes up in an article. It is currently available for Chrome, Firefox and Safari and is completely free. As you can imagine, reading about how your Member of Congress voted in a recent health bill becomes all the more enlightening if you know how much money the health industry showered him in at the last election.

    I spoke to Nick Rubin about the plugin, politics and what he calls the “money stories” behind what you read in the news.

    VICE: Hi Nick. So how did you come up with the idea for Greenhouse?
    Nick Rubin: Back in seventh grade, I gave a presentation on corporate personhood and ever since then I’ve been really interested in that issue. I think the one problem is that the sources of income for members of congress haven’t been simple and easily accessible when people have needed it. More recently, I’ve been teaching myself how to code and I thought that something like Greenhouse that puts the data at people’s fingertips would be a perfect solution. It really is the intersection of these two passions of mine—coding and politics. I made it after school and on weekends on my computer.

    Why the name?
    Well, green is the color of money in the US, and house refers to the two houses of Congress [the Senate and House of Representatives]. The name also implies transparency; greenhouses are see through and they are built to help things thrive.

    Where did you get the information on the politician’s donations?
    It uses the data from the last full election cycle which was 2012. This is simply because it’s just the most complete set of data that we have. But, the browser does provide access to the most up to date 2014 information by just clicking the name of the politician on the top of the window or theOpenSecrets.org link in the popup. So the 2014 data is just one click away.

    I’m intending to update the data as a whole later in the election cycle as the 2014 contributions are more complete. These are updates I’m currently working on, as well as thinking of other ways I can expand the tool.

    Continue